FAQ

What is Think Twice?


Think Twice Healthy Relationships program is a no-cost interactive Sexual Risk Avoidance presentation for students. Think Twice Healthy Relationships program has been reviewed and endorsed by a medical review board, is in compliance with the Healthy Youth Act, and is medically and scientifically accurate. It has been approved by ESD 105 for use by its area school districts.

Think Twice is a positive youth development program designed to encourage youth in our community to make smart choices now in order to reach their goals for the future. It encourages the students and young adults to avoid high risk behaviors by equipping them to develop positive character traits, make good, healthy decisions, and focus on their future goals. Think Twice invests in the next generation by encouraging them to build healthier relationships with those around them, especially those relationships that involve a “significant other.” Think Twice is a relationship, abstinence-based education program developed for public and private schools, as well as other youth organizations. Think Twice is the prevention arm of Life Choices, which is a medical pregnancy center located in Yakima, Washington.




Can you provide a Detailed Outline and sources for the Think Twice Presentation?


1. Goals
o 5 years
o 10-15 years

2. College, Career, Marriage (Life-long mutually monogamous relationship)

3. Benefits of Marriage

4. Goals wrap up- What can you be doing today that will have an effect on your goals?
5. What is Maturity
o Responsibility
o Respect
o Restraint

6. What is Maturity? (continued)
o Feel, Think, Act

7. Character
o Who you are when no one is looking/Choosing the harder right over the easier wrong.

8. Character (continued)
o John Wooden quote (Things turn out best for those who make the best of how things turn out)

9. Abstinence
o Choosing not to do something when you have the opportunity

10. Sexual Abstinence
o Choosing to reserve sexual activity
o Sexual activity – this includes oral, anal, and vaginal intercourse as well as genital to genital contact.
o 59% of high school students have never had sex (Healthy Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance)

11. Why do teens choose not to have sex?

12. Why do teens choose to engage in sexual activity?

13. Influences (on our sexual decisions)

14. Sexual Progression

15. Possible Results (of sexual activity)
o STIs, Pregnancy, Emotional

16. Teen Parent (the affects)

17. Condoms (info from the CDC)

18. Sexual Progression concluded

19. Prevention
o Is there a 100% way of not contracting an STI or becoming pregnant?

20. Prevention (continued)
o If sex is reserved then there will not be any chance of contracting STI or becoming pregnant, but there will still be emotional consequences with a break-up, but perhaps not as strong.

21. The Brain & Sex
o How the brain makes pathways, the pruning process in the teen brain, the bonding chemicals, etc.

22. Train-a-brain
o Dr. Ivan Pavlov, brain conditioning

23.The Office clip, brain conditioning video

24. Porn Kills Love, Fight the New Drug

25. Boundaries
o Where should you put your boundary?
o When should you talk to your partner about your boundaries?
o Who else should you confide in about your boundaries? (accountability/not going it alone

26. Intimacy
o Emotional closeness
o Developed through long association

27. Intimacy Progression
o Low to High level of intimacy

28. Safest Sex

29. Love vs. Infatuation

30. Love vs. Infatuation (continued)
o Definitions

31. Creative Dating
o Allows you to really get to know someone
o Involves planning a fun date ahead of time

32. Plan your own Creative Date! (activity)

33. How to Breakup Well

34. Safety Issue

35. Tea & Consent Video

36. Ways to say NO

37. Drugs/ Alcohol & Sex
o How do drugs and alcohol influence sexual activity?

38. Sexting
o The act of sending sexually explicit messages or photos…
o 75% of teens say “sexting” can have serious negative consequences, yet 39% admit to doing it. (according to The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy

39. Sexting (continued)
o Questions to ask yourself before you press send.

40. Think before you post video

41. What is abuse?
o Physical
o Verbal/Bullying/Emotional
o Sexual
o Date Rape/Acquaintance Rape

42. Just because it’s not physical, doesn’t mean it’s not abuse” video

43. Bullying
o Emotional, Physical, Sexual, Verbal, Cyber

44. What is abuse? (final)
o Seek help from (list)
o Comprehensive’s info and phone number

45. How are your decisions going to affect your goals?

46. Starting Today:
o Decide, Detach, Develop, Support

47. What do you want…for your future…for your community…for you?

48. Conclusion / Thank you
___

PRESENTATION SOURCES:

Slide 5: Married People
1. Hess, Andrew; Stanton, Glenn T. “The Health Benefits of Marriage.” Focus on the Family. Focus on the Family. September 2012. Web. 17 Feb 2016. https://www.focusonthefamily.com/about_us/focus-findings/marriage/health-benefits-of-marriage.aspx“
2. The Benefits of Marriage.” Familyfacts.org. The Heritage Foundation. n.d. Web.17 Feb. 2016. http://www.familyfacts.org/briefs/1/the-benefits-of-marriage

Slide : Why teens choose to engage in sexual activity
1. Kaiser Family Foundation; Hoff, Tina; Greene, Liberty; Davis, Julia. “National Survey of Adolescents and Young Adults: Sexual Health Knowledge, Attitudes and Experiences.” The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. 2003. Web. 24 October 2016. https://kaiserfamilyfoundation.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/national-survey-of-adolescents-and-young-adults.pdf 2. Kramer, Amy. “Virgin Territory: What Young Adults Say About Sex, Love, Relationships, and The First Time.” TheNationalCampaingn.org. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. June 2014. Web. 29 February 2016. https://thenationalcampaign.org/resource/virgin-territory

Slide 11: Sexual Abstinence
1. “Sexual Risk Behaviors: HIV, STD, & Teen Pregnancy Prevention.”CDC. CDC. 16 Feb 2016. Web. 17 Feb 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/sexualbehaviors/

Slides 15 & 16: Possible Results
1. “Statistics Overview.” CDC. CDC. 11 September 2015. Web. 25 February 2016.
2. “HIV Basics.” CDC. CDC. 6 November 2015. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/index.html]
3. “Genital HPV Infection - Fact Sheet.” CDC. CDC. 18 February 2016. Web. 25 February 2016.
4. “HPV and Cancer.” National Cancer Institute. National Institute of Health. 19 February 2015. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/causes-prevention/risk/infectious-agents/hpv-fact-sheet
5. “Genital HPV Infection - Fact Sheet.” CDC. CDC. 3 January 2017. Web. 6 March 2017. https://www.cdc.gov/std/hpv/stdfact-hpv.htm“
6. Genital Herpes - CDC Fact Sheet (Detailed).” CDC. CDC. 17 November 2015. Web 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes-detailed.htm“
7. Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public.” CDC. CDC. 23 October 2015. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/bfaq.htm#overview“
8. Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public.” CDC. CDC. 8 January 2016. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/cfaq.htm#overview“
9. Types of STIs-STDs.” SexualityandU.ca. The Society of Obstetricians and Gynecologists of Canada. n.d. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.sexualityandu.ca/stis-stds/types-of-stis-stds

Slide 17: Possible Results
1. “Trichomoniasis - CDC Fact Sheet.” CDC. CDC. 17 November 2015. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/trichomonas/stdfact-trichomoniasis.htm

Slide 18: Possible Results
1. “Chlamydia - CDC Fact Sheet (Detailed).” CDC. CDC. 17 November 2015. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/chlamydia/stdfact-chlamydia-detailed.htm
2. “Sexually Transmitted Disease Profile Yakima County 2014.” Washington State Department of Health. Washington State Department of Health. 2014. Web. 15 February 2016. http://www.doh.wa.gov/Portals/1/Documents/Pubs/347-634-Yakima2014.pdf3.
3. “Gonorrhea - CDC Fact Sheet (Detailed Version).” CDC. CDC. 17 November 2015. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/gonorrhea/stdfact-gonorrhea-detailed.htm4.
4. “Syphilis - CDC Fact Sheet (Detailed).” CDC. CDC. 2 November 2015. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/stdfact-syphilis-detailed.htm5.
5. “Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet (Detailed Version).” CDC. CDC. 4 May 2015. Web 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/pid/stdfact-pid-detailed.htm6. 6. “Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet.” CDC. CDC. 18 February 2016. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/pid/stdfact-pid.htm7.
7. “Reported STDs in the United States. 2013 National Data for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, and Syphilis.” CDC. CDC. January 2014. Web. 25 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/stats12/std-trends-508-2012.pdf

Slide 19: Possible Results
1. “The National Story.” TheNationalCampaign.org. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. n.d. Web. 29 February 2016. https://thenationalcampaign.org/data/landing
2. “Teen Pregnancy in the United States.” TheNationalCampaign.org. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. August 2014. Web. 29 February 2016. https://thenationalcampaign.org/resource/fast-facts-teen-pregnancy-united-states
3. “Teen Childbearing in the United States, 2014 Birth Data.” TheNationalCampaign.org. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. January 2016. Web. 29 February 2016. https://thenationalcampaign.org/resource/teen-childbearing-united-states-2014-birth-data

Slide 20: Possible Results
1. Kramer, Amy. “Virgin Territory: What Young Adults Say About Sex, Love, Relationships, and The First Time.” TheNationalCampaingn.org. The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. June 2014. Web. 29 February 2016. https://thenationalcampaign.org/resource/virgin-territory

Slide 21: Condoms
1. “Clinical Prevention Guidance.” CDC. CDC. 28 January 2011. Web. 17 February 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/std/treatment/2010/clinical.htm2.
2. “Sexual Risk Behaviors: HIV, STD, & Teen Pregnancy Prevention.” CDC. CDC. 16 Feb 2016. Web. 17 Feb 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/healthyyouth/sexualbehaviors/

Slide 25: The Brain & Sex
1. Goldman, Bruce. “New imaging method developed at Stanford reveals stunning details of brain connections.” StanfordMedicine. Stanford University. 17 Nov 2010. Web. 18 Feb 2016. https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2010/11/new-imaging-method-developed-at-stanford-reveals-stunning-details-of-brain-connections.html
2. Pattyn, Denny. “Use It OR Lose It Process In The Teenage Brain.” Silver Ring Thing. Ellensburg High School, Ellensburg, WA. 29 April, 2015.
3. McIlhaney, Joe S., M.D. and Freda McKissie Bush, M.D. Hooked New Science on How Casual Sex is Affecting Our Children. Chicago: Northfield Publishing, 2008. Print.

Slide 26: The Brain & Sex
1. McIlhaney, Joe S., M.D. and Freda McKissie Bush, M.D. Hooked New Science on How Casual Sex is Affecting Our Children. Chicago: Northfield Publishing, 2008. Print.

Slide 29: Boundaries
1. "When Life Doesn't Turn Out the Way You Planned." Juli Slattery, Shana Miller. Java With Juli. Authentic Intimacy. Authentic Intimacy. 16 April 2016. Web. 2 May 2016. https://authenticintimacy.com/java-with-juli/when-life-doesnt-turn-out-the-way-youve-planned

Slide 31: Intimacy Progression
1. Schutte, Shana. “Three Lies About Premarital Sex.” Focus on the Family. Focus on the Family. n.d. Web. 25 April 2016. http://www.focusonthefamily.com/faith/christian-singles/being-single-and-faithful/three-lies-about-sex-before-marriage

Slide 33 & 34: Love Vs Infatuation
1. “Infatuation Vs Love.” Diffen.com. n.p. n.d. Web. 3 March 2016. http://www.diffen.com/difference/Infatuation_vs_Love
2. Ingram, Chip. “12 Tests of Love.” Family Life. Family Life. 2003. Web. 3 March 2016. http://www.familylife.com/articles/topics/marriage/getting-married/choosing-a-spouse/12-tests-of-love

Slide 38: Tea & Consent
1. “AAU CAMPUS SURVEY ON SEXUAL ASSAULT AND SEXUAL MISCONDUCT.” Association of American Universities. Association of American Universities. n.d. Web. 7 March 2016. http://www.aau.edu/Climate-Survey.aspx?id=16525

Slide 40: Drugs/Alcohol & Sex
1. “Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance — United States, 2013.” CDC. CDC. 2013. Web. 7 March 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6304.pdf

Slide 41: Sexting
1. “Sex and Tech: Results from a Survey of Teens and Young Adults.” TheNationalCampaingn.org The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. December 2008. Web. 7 March 2016. http://thenationalcampaign.org/resource/sex-and-tech

Slide 43: Sexting
1. “Sex and Tech: Results from a Survey of Teens and Young Adults.” TheNationalCampaingn.org The National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. December 2008. Web. 7 March 2016. http://thenationalcampaign.org/resource/sex-and-tech
2. Steiner, Monica. “Teen Sexting in Washington.” Criminal Defense Lawyer. NOLO. n.d. Web. 7 March 2016. http://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/resources/teen-sexting-washington.htm

Slide 44: What is Abuse?
1. “Teen Dating Violence.” CDC. CDC. 1 February 2016. Web. 7 March 2016. http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/intimatepartnerviolence/teen_dating_violence.html
2. “Is This Abuse? Types of Abuse.” Loveisrespect.org. National Domestic Violence Hotline & Break the Cycle. n.d. Web. 7 March 2016. http://www.loveisrespect.org/is-this-abuse/types-of-abuse/#tab-id-1
3. “Date Rape.” USciences University of the Sciences. University of the Sciences of Philadelphia. n.d. Web. 7 March 2016. http://www.usciences.edu/shac/counseling/daterape.shtml

Slide 46: Bullying
“Bullying Defined.” TEENS AGAINST BULLYING. Pacer Center. n.d. Web 27 October 2016. http://www.pacerteensagainstbullying.org/tab/bullying-defined/




Where do the Think Twice Materials come from? Are they accurate?


Think Twice materials come from several different organizations and youth programs. Most Think Twice presentation materials came from AWARE of Life Options in Grandview, Washington, and RELATE of Whatcom County Pregnancy Clinic. Our program is built on outstanding curriculum, thorough training, and enthusiastic speakers. Think Twice is updated and revised by the Think Twice Committee. Think Twice materials have been reviewed by medical doctors and have been approved as medically accurate. (All statistics and facts used in our presentations are documented and cited; these can be provided upon request.)




Who is Think Twice appropriate for?


Think Twice consists of classroom presentations for middle-school and high-school aged teenagers, one-on-one mentoring in our center for those students that choose abstinence until marriage, as well as presentations tailored to a church youth group setting.

Think Twice satisfies themes 1 – 8 of the federal guidelines for abstinence and sex education in the public school classrooms.




What issues are addressed by the Think Twice curriculum?


Think Twice curriculum addresses issues that affect young adults, teens, and pre-teens. Topics may include but may not be limited to: making healthy choices, negative and positive consequences for choices, developing character and healthy self-esteem, friendships, integrity, maturity, goals, avoiding risky behaviors and their consequences (such as drugs, gangs, alcohol, violence, sex, and self-harm), defining love and infatuation, developing healthy, positive relationships, and sexual abstinence.




Are there any charges involved for Think Twice presentations?


Think Twice is supported solely by grants and donations, and there is no charge to schools and other youth organizations and/or students for presentations or materials.




Is the Think Twice presentation useful to LGBTQ+ teenagers?


Absolutely. Encouraging young people, irrespective of their sexual orientation, to delay sex promotes equality in health for all. Think Twice is an SRA program. SRA programs by nature share universally transferable principles from which all students can benefit including: ·Sexual delay
·Fewer lifetime partners
·Developing healthy relationships
·Setting boundaries
·Reserving sex for a lifetime, faithful, monogamous and uninfected partner are protective factors that help all teens avoid risk
In addition, the holistic nature of SRA programs address broader, generalized topics regarding adolescent development relevant to all teens.




Is your presentation relevant to sexually active teens?


Sexually experienced teens receive the skills and positive empowerment to make healthier choices in the future as a result of our Think Twice Healthy Relationships Program (SRA education). A published study demonstrated that those enrolled in an SRA program were much more likely to choose to abstain than their sexually experienced peers who did not receive SRA education. And further, about one half of sexually active 18- and 19-year olds wish they had waited longer before becoming sexually active. The SRA message is important to all teens regardless of orientation or sexual experience. Every teen deserves to receive the knowledge and skills needed to achieve optimal health. To do otherwise exhibits an unacceptable form of “advantage discrimination” to those at greatest risk.




Is Think Twice in accordance with Healthy Youth Act?


Yes. Think Twice respects all the requirements listed below:


Healthy Youth Act

RCWs > Title 28A > Chapter 28A.300 > Section 28A.300.475

28A.300.471 << 28A.300.475 >> 28A.300.480

RCW 28A.300.475

Medically accurate sexual health education—Curricula—Participation excused—Parental review.

(1) By September 1, 2008, every public school that offers sexual health education must assure that sexual health education is medically and scientifically accurate, age-appropriate, appropriate for students regardless of gender, race, disability status, or sexual orientation, and includes information about abstinence and other methods of preventing unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. All sexual health information, instruction, and materials must be medically and scientifically accurate. Abstinence may not be taught to the exclusion of other materials and instruction on contraceptives and disease prevention. A school may choose to use separate, outside speakers or prepared curriculum to teach different content areas or units within the comprehensive sexual health program as long as all speakers, curriculum, and materials used are in compliance with this section. Sexual health education must be consistent with the January 2005 guidelines for sexual health information and disease prevention developed by the department of health and the office of the superintendent of public instruction.

(2) As used in chapter 265, Laws of 2007, "medically and scientifically accurate" means information that is verified or supported by research in compliance with scientific methods, is published in peer-review journals, where appropriate, and is recognized as accurate and objective by professional organizations and agencies with expertise in the field of sexual health including but not limited to the American college of obstetricians and gynecologists, the Washington state department of health, and the federal centers for disease control and prevention.

(3) The superintendent of public instruction and the department of health shall make the January 2005 guidelines for sexual health information and disease prevention available to school districts, teachers, and guest speakers on their web sites. Within available resources, the superintendent of public instruction and the department of health shall make any related information, model policies, curricula, or other resources available as well.

(4) The superintendent of public instruction, in consultation with the department of health, shall develop a list of sexual health education curricula that are consistent with the 2005 guidelines for sexual health information and disease prevention. This list shall be intended to serve as a resource for schools, teachers, or any other organization or community group, and shall be updated no less frequently than annually and made available on the web sites of the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the department of health.

(5) Public schools that offer sexual health education are encouraged to review their sexual health curricula and choose a curriculum from the list developed under subsection (4) of this section. Any public school that offers sexual health education may identify, choose, or develop any other curriculum, if the curriculum chosen or developed complies with the requirements of this section.

(6) Any parent or legal guardian who wishes to have his or her child excused from any planned instruction in sexual health education may do so upon filing a written request with the school district board of directors or its designee, or the principal of the school his or her child attends, or the principal's designee. In addition, any parent or legal guardian may review the sexual health education curriculum offered in his or her child's school by filing a written request with the school district board of directors, the principal of the school his or her child attends, or the principal's designee.

(7) The office of the superintendent of public instruction shall, through its Washington state school health profiles survey or other existing reporting mechanism, ask public schools to identify any curricula used to provide sexual health education, and shall report the results of this inquiry to the legislature on a biennial basis, beginning with the 2008-09 school year.

(8) The requirement to report harassment, intimidation, or bullying under RCW 28A.600.480(2) applies to this section.

[2007 c 265 § 2.]

NOTES:

Finding—Intent—2007 c 265: "(1) The legislature finds that young people should have the knowledge and skills necessary to build healthy relationships, and to protect themselves from unintended pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV infection. The primary responsibility for sexual health education is with parents and guardians. However, this responsibility also extends to schools and other community groups. It is in the public's best interest to ensure that young people are equipped with medically and scientifically accurate, age-appropriate information that will help them avoid unintended pregnancies, remain free of sexually transmitted diseases, and make informed, responsible decisions throughout their lives.

(2) The legislature intends to support and advance the standards established in the January 2005 guidelines for sexual health information and disease prevention developed by the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the department of health. These guidelines are a fundamental tool to help school districts, teachers, guest speakers, health and counseling providers, community groups, parents, and guardians choose, develop, and evaluate sexual health curricula to better meet the health and safety needs of adolescents and young adults in their communities." [2007 c 265 § 1.]

Short title—2007 c 265: "This act may be known and cited as the healthy youth act." [2007 c 265 § 3.]




What are the policies of Think Twice Yakima?


  1. All Think Twice materials and training are for the specific use and participation in Think Twice presentations that are under the direction of Think Twice and Life Choices of Yakima. These materials may not be copied or distributed to any other organization, school or person without the permission of the Executive Director.
  2. In the event an approved organization or person presents Think Twice materials, credit must be given to Think Twice and Life Choices. The organization's services and literature may be offered to students; however, Life Choices' services must also be mentioned.
  3. All Think Twice presentations must be scheduled through the Think Twice Coordinator. If you are asked to present for a group or event, please refer the client to the Think Twice Coordinator to schedule the speaking engagement.
  4. We are a volunteer organization. We DO NOT accept gratuity for presenting, but we are an organization supported by donations, and you may donate to the Think Twice Program through Life Choices.
  5. We are not medical experts. We will refer students to a health care professional for specific medical questions. We may also refer students to the 24 hour helpline that is listed on Life Choices website and other materials.
  6. We are not professional counselors.
  7. No presentations may be recorded or taped without the knowledge and permission of the presenter and Think Twice Coordinator. This is to avoid the possibility of our program being misrepresented in some way and to protect both the presenter and the program.
  8. We never give out our personal information to students. We refer them to the Center for support or assistance. If they only want to speak with one of our presenters, we can make arrangements for an appointment at Life Choices’ office. For unique situations, please speak directly to the Executive Director.
  9. A certified teacher must be in the public/private school classroom at all times during any Think Twice presentation. This is for the protection of all parties involved and is also a legal matter.
  10. If a student indicated either in writing or verbally that they have been or are being abused or that they are contemplating suicide or hurting themselves or others, we are required by law to report this. We will inform the classroom teacher or school counselor.





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© 2018 THINK TWICE, YAKIMA WA.

Tel: (509) 248-2273 | Email: manager@thinktwiceyakima.com

THINK TWICE Sexual Risk Avoidance Education Initiative is supported by the United States Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children, Youth and Families, Grant #: 90TS00230100.
Opinions and findings of the program do not reflect those of the U.S. DHHS.

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